Dating houses external evidence

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Please help support the mission of New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download. Luke and Timothy escaped, probably because they did not look like Jews (Timothy's father was a gentile). Luke accompanied him from Philippi to Troas, and with him made the long coasting voyage described in Acts 20. Mark; and in the Acts he knows all the details of St. Mark's mother, and the name of the girl who ran to the outer door when St. Plummer argues that these sections are by the same author as the rest of the Acts: The change of person seems natural and true to the narrative, but there is no change of language.

Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only .99... When Paul departed from Philippi, Luke was left behind, in all probability to carry on the work of Evangelist. Luke is "the brother, whose praise is in the gospel through all the churches" (2 Corinthians ), and that he was one of the bearers of the letter to Corinth. He went up to Jerusalem, was present at the uproar, saw the attack on the Apostle, and heard him speaking "in the Hebrew tongue" from the steps outside the fortress Antonia to the silenced crowd. The characteristic expressions of the writer run through the whole book, and are as frequent in the "we" as in the other sections. Harnack (Luke the Physician, 40) makes an exhaustive examination of every word and phrase in the first of the "we" sections (xvi, 10-17), and shows how frequent they are in the rest of the Acts and the Gospel, when compared with the other Gospels. Luke (Gospels and Acts), and that in all parts of the work." When he comes to the end of his study of this section he is able to write: "After this demonstration those who declare that this passage was derived from a source, and so was not composed by the author of the whole work, take up a most difficult position. In regard to vocabulary, syntax, and style, he must have transformed everything else into his own language.

When doubtful cases and expressions common to the Septuagint, are set aside, a large number remain that seem quite unassailable. 13) says: "It is as good as certain from the subject-matter, and more especially from the style, of this great work that the author was a physician by profession. And, indeed, this conclusion holds good not only for the 'we' sections, but for the whole book." Harnack gives the subject special treatment in an appendix of twenty-two pages. The latter observes (Einl., II, 427): "Hobart has proved for everyone who can appreciate proof that the author of the Lucan work was a man practised in the scientific language of Greek medicine--in short, a Greek physician" (quoted by Harnack, op. In this connection, Plummer, though he speaks more cautiously of Hobart's argument, is practically in agreement with these writers. From the manner in which he is spoken of, a long period of intercourse is implied. The same author gives long lists of words and expressions found in the Gospel and Acts and in St. But more than this, Eager in "The Expositor" (July and August, 1894), in his attempt to prove that St.

This opinion is fast gaining ground even amongst ultra critics, and Harnack declares that the others hold out because there exists a disposition amongst them to ignore the facts that tell against them, and he speaks of "the truly pitiful history of the criticism of the Acts". Colossians, II Corinthians, the Pastoral Epistles, First (and to a lesser extent Second) Peter, possess a Lucan character." When all these points are taken into consideration, they afford convincing proof that the author of the Gospel and Acts was St. Paul, and this is fully borne out by the external evidence.

Only the briefest summary of the arguments can be given here. Of the characteristic words and phrases which mark the three Synoptic Gospels a little more than half are common to St. The proof in favour of the unity of authorship, derived from the internal character of the two books, is strengthened when taken in connection with the external evidence.

Luke", introd.) The word seems to have been unknown before the Christian Era; but Lucanus is common in inscriptions, and is found at the beginning and end of the Gospel in some Old Latin manuscripts (ibid.). In Codex Bezæ (D) Luke is introduced by a "we" as early as Acts ; and, though this is not a correct reading, it represents a very ancient tradition. Paul from those of the circumcision (Colossians ), and his style proves that he was a Greek.

(Luke) is probably an abbreviation from Lucanus, like Annas from Ananus, Apollos from Apollonius, Artemas from Artemidorus, Demas from Demetrius, etc. des heiligen Lucas", 1, 2; Lightfoot on "Col.", iv, 14; Plummer, "St. Eusebius (--"Lucas vero domo Antiochenus, arte medicus, qui et cum Paulo diu conjunctissime vixit, et cum reliquis Apostolis studiose versatus est." Eusebius has a clearer statement in his "Quæstiones Evangelicæ", IV, i, 270: --"Luke was by birth a native of the renowned Antioch" (Schmiedel, "Encyc. Spitta, Schmiedel, and Harnack think this is a quotation from Julius Africanus (first half of the third century).

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